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Andrei Kioresku

Andrei Kioresku’s paintings depicting seemingly simple and uncomplicated scenes of rural life are full of emotional energy and have an amazing effect on the viewer — the whole canvas seems to overflow with a strong sense of joy and optimism. This effect is achieved through the painter’s expressive use of color; his intricate patchwork quilt of colors immediately catches the eye. Small segments of colors explode into warm fields of grain being harvested, into a country church bathed in sunlight, or into the vibrant bouquet of wild flowers left on a windowsill. Kioresku constantly experiments with materials and textures to achieve these multidimensional effects. To create more depth and texture, he does not use commercially produced canvases but, rather, sugar sacks. Using a three hundred year old process, he stretches the burlap over a frame and applies a number of coats of gelatin glue and gesso, buffing after each layer. As a result, flat patches of pure color heighten the awareness of emotional and symbolic elements in his paintings. Andrei Kioresku’s style can be characterized as post-modernism or — as he prefers to call it — subjective realism. (The artist travels a lot for inspiration and never paints on site.) His process of creation consists of many sensations and thoughts, which morph with real life images. The artist presents the viewer with new angles and unusual points of view into very ordinary things. Kioresku creates a technique that is based on the traditions of the great Impressionist artists — dynamic use of primary colors and their contrasts is the artist’s greatest strength. Kioresku spent his early childhood in a rural province of the Ural Mountains. During summer breaks, he was sent to the village where his grandparents lived. Kioresku feels a very powerful connection to his roots; images of childhood have left their imprint on him and continue to influence him. He is a graduate of the Muchin Art Institute, one of the most prestigious art schools in Russia, and now lives and works in St. Petersburg. “In St. Petersburg I feel an unusual spirit which draws creative people. They are more benevolent and open, and much more appreciative of the arts.” Living in the shadow of the Hermitage, Kioresku enjoys the opportunity to study the techniques of masters such as Van Gogh, Cézanne and Gauguin. Kioresku’s works have a distinctive appeal, and besides Moscow and St. Petersburg, they are represented in many public collections throughout Europe, Japan and the United States.

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I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
I.B.Clark Gallery
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